Enhancing an “Upstanding Bird”
During a visit to the Audubon Zoo in New Orleans I came across a black-crowned night heron standing on a railing. It looked like a wild heron since it didn’t have a leg band and it was able to fly. The bird seemed quite used to people, so it just calmly stood there while I managed to get eight shots of it before some kids came up and scared it off. This one is my favorite. I find the red eye quite captivating. 
(Read the GIMP tutorial on how I enhanced the original photo.)

Enhancing an “Upstanding Bird”

During a visit to the Audubon Zoo in New Orleans I came across a black-crowned night heron standing on a railing. It looked like a wild heron since it didn’t have a leg band and it was able to fly. The bird seemed quite used to people, so it just calmly stood there while I managed to get eight shots of it before some kids came up and scared it off. This one is my favorite. I find the red eye quite captivating.

(Read the GIMP tutorial on how I enhanced the original photo.)

Grin and Bear It – Buffing Up a BruinThe Cameron Park Zoo in Waco, Texas, has an interesting black bear habitat. On the day I visited, there was an enormous number of wild black vultures hanging out with the bears. Apparently the bears don’t mind the vultures and pay little attention to them. I really like the expression on this bear’s face, so I chose to create a close-up image.(Read the GIMP tutorial on Blogspot.)

Grin and Bear It – Buffing Up a Bruin

The Cameron Park Zoo in Waco, Texas, has an interesting black bear habitat. On the day I visited, there was an enormous number of wild black vultures hanging out with the bears. Apparently the bears don’t mind the vultures and pay little attention to them. I really like the expression on this bear’s face, so I chose to create a close-up image.

(Read the GIMP tutorial on Blogspot.)

Creating the “Majestic Lionfish” Portrait
The Cameron Park Zoo in Waco, Texas, has a building containing some tanks of fish and other sea creatures. One that fascinated me (and most of the crowd passing by) was the lionfish tank. The glass was reasonably clean, the lighting was good, and there were very few items in the tank to obstruct views of the fish. It was nice that there were only a few fish, and they swam around slowly, giving lots of opportunities for interesting shots. I took 100 photos. This was my favorite shot. It was also the first photo I took.
(Read more on Blogspot.)
(Redbubble, Society6, Zazzle)

Creating the “Majestic Lionfish” Portrait

The Cameron Park Zoo in Waco, Texas, has a building containing some tanks of fish and other sea creatures. One that fascinated me (and most of the crowd passing by) was the lionfish tank. The glass was reasonably clean, the lighting was good, and there were very few items in the tank to obstruct views of the fish. It was nice that there were only a few fish, and they swam around slowly, giving lots of opportunities for interesting shots. I took 100 photos. This was my favorite shot. It was also the first photo I took.

(Read more on Blogspot.)

(Redbubble, Society6, Zazzle)

A Painting Tutorial by Evelyne Schulz
Many months ago I discovered Evelyne Schulz on Twitter due to a GIMP-related post. I immediately loved her artwork and, after some correspondence, she graciously agreed to write a tutorial about how she creates her digital paintings in GIMP. What follows is what she wrote about how she created her Warrior painting, with editing and inclusion of a description of the Palette Editor by me.
(Read more on Blogspot.)

A Painting Tutorial by Evelyne Schulz

Many months ago I discovered Evelyne Schulz on Twitter due to a GIMP-related post. I immediately loved her artwork and, after some correspondence, she graciously agreed to write a tutorial about how she creates her digital paintings in GIMP. What follows is what she wrote about how she created her Warrior painting, with editing and inclusion of a description of the Palette Editor by me.

(Read more on Blogspot.)

Creating the “Fibonacci Cockatoo” Portrait
The Fort Worth Zoo has an Australian section, and just outside of the building containing some aquatic animals is a small area containing a few trees where the keepers place various types of Australian birds. One is the Red-tailed Black Cockatoo. This bird normally looks blackish with some red markings on the tail. On the day that I shot 15 photos of this bird, the lighting brought out the blue in the feathers. I chose to work with this particular image because I really liked the way the feathers were spread out around the curve of the neck with the head turned back over the body.
(Read more on Blogspot.)

Creating the “Fibonacci Cockatoo” Portrait

The Fort Worth Zoo has an Australian section, and just outside of the building containing some aquatic animals is a small area containing a few trees where the keepers place various types of Australian birds. One is the Red-tailed Black Cockatoo. This bird normally looks blackish with some red markings on the tail. On the day that I shot 15 photos of this bird, the lighting brought out the blue in the feathers. I chose to work with this particular image because I really liked the way the feathers were spread out around the curve of the neck with the head turned back over the body.

(Read more on Blogspot.)

Creating the “Grumpy Gorilla” Portrait
In October of 2013, my husband and I went to Albuquerque, New Mexico, for a vacation. One of the attractions we visited was the ABQ BioPark Zoo, also known as the Rio Grande Zoo. We became fascinated with one of the gorilla exhibits that contained a bachelor group of gorillas. One gorilla in particular enjoyed interacting with people. He sat down at the front of the enclosure and proceeded to go through a range of actions, including tearing up and fiddling with pieces of paper, beating his chest, folding his arms, and making popping noises with his lips. We merrily snapped away with our cameras while he did all this. I took 130 pictures. Once we were back home and I had a chance to review them all, I chose this one because I really like the attitude and personality it presents.
(Read more on Blogspot.)

Creating the “Grumpy Gorilla” Portrait

In October of 2013, my husband and I went to Albuquerque, New Mexico, for a vacation. One of the attractions we visited was the ABQ BioPark Zoo, also known as the Rio Grande Zoo. We became fascinated with one of the gorilla exhibits that contained a bachelor group of gorillas. One gorilla in particular enjoyed interacting with people. He sat down at the front of the enclosure and proceeded to go through a range of actions, including tearing up and fiddling with pieces of paper, beating his chest, folding his arms, and making popping noises with his lips. We merrily snapped away with our cameras while he did all this. I took 130 pictures. Once we were back home and I had a chance to review them all, I chose this one because I really like the attitude and personality it presents.

(Read more on Blogspot.)

How to Import EPS Files into Inkscape

While browsing the shelves of a local discount book store, I stumbled upon an interesting pattern book called Drip.Dot.Swirl. by Von Glitschka, published by HOW Books in 2009. Being a bit of a pattern nut and seeing a lot of patterns in the book that I liked, I was about to buy the book when I noticed that the DVD that was supposed to be in the back of the book was missing. The DVD contains editable vector files, swatch libraries, and tutorials and is at least half the reason for buying the book. Being undaunted, after a quick search online I found the book on amazon.com and had a copy in my hands within a week.







I happily popped the DVD into the drive and grabbed the first vector file, only to discover that all the files are in encapsulated PostScript (EPS) format and plain vanilla Inkscape is completely unable to load them. Fine. Back to the internet. After poking around for a while I finally found some useful instructions at InkscapeForum.com. Here’s a quick step-by-step on how to set up Inkscape so that it can read EPS files.
(Read more on Blogspot.)

How to Import EPS Files into Inkscape

While browsing the shelves of a local discount book store, I stumbled upon an interesting pattern book called Drip.Dot.Swirl. by Von Glitschka, published by HOW Books in 2009. Being a bit of a pattern nut and seeing a lot of patterns in the book that I liked, I was about to buy the book when I noticed that the DVD that was supposed to be in the back of the book was missing. The DVD contains editable vector files, swatch libraries, and tutorials and is at least half the reason for buying the book. Being undaunted, after a quick search online I found the book on amazon.com and had a copy in my hands within a week.

image

I happily popped the DVD into the drive and grabbed the first vector file, only to discover that all the files are in encapsulated PostScript (EPS) format and plain vanilla Inkscape is completely unable to load them. Fine. Back to the internet. After poking around for a while I finally found some useful instructions at InkscapeForum.com. Here’s a quick step-by-step on how to set up Inkscape so that it can read EPS files.

(Read more on Blogspot.)

Four Ways to Draw a Border Around a Selection in GIMP
I was recently asked for a quick way to draw a border three pixels wide around the inside edge of a rectangular selection on top of an in-progress graphic design. Two methods immediately came to mind and a third occurred to me later that afternoon. I discovered a fourth method while writing this article.
Method 1
The most obvious method to use is Select > Border [1], which opens the Border Selection dialog [2]. This dialog contains three adjustments. (Read more on Blogspot.)

Four Ways to Draw a Border Around a Selection in GIMP

I was recently asked for a quick way to draw a border three pixels wide around the inside edge of a rectangular selection on top of an in-progress graphic design. Two methods immediately came to mind and a third occurred to me later that afternoon. I discovered a fourth method while writing this article.

Method 1

The most obvious method to use is Select > Border [1], which opens the Border Selection dialog [2]. This dialog contains three adjustments.

(Read more on Blogspot.)

Alignment and Distribution of Graphic Elements in Inkscape
Inkscape’s alignment and distribution functionality is wonderful to use for organizing graphic or typographic design elements or laying out printed matter. In this tutorial I will demonstrate this by creating a simple graphic design of colored stars.
(Read more on Blogspot.)

Alignment and Distribution of Graphic Elements in Inkscape

Inkscape’s alignment and distribution functionality is wonderful to use for organizing graphic or typographic design elements or laying out printed matter. In this tutorial I will demonstrate this by creating a simple graphic design of colored stars.

(Read more on Blogspot.)